Maxalding

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Re: Maxalding

Postby colinkbell » Fri Mar 17, 2017 6:30 pm

Nice to hear from you gain Norman and hope your health has improved. Rather than hijack your thread, i am about to start another Maxalding thread later on. Keep at it!
Colin
" Strengthen ye the weak hands and confirm the feeble knees" Isaiah 35 v3
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Re: Maxalding

Postby Norman » Fri Mar 17, 2017 7:25 pm

Hey colin, nice to hear from you too! I hope you´re doing well. If you want, feel free to use this thread to write about Maxalding... I would like to read about your experiences with this art!

Looking forward to hear from you, kind regards,
Norman
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Re: Maxalding

Postby DannyBoy » Fri Mar 24, 2017 11:19 pm

Norman wrote:Hi folks,
I´m back again! Having gained a certain control over my health, I´m getting now deeper into the practice of Maxalding. I hope you all are doing well, I will report my momentary program sharing my results!
Here is my program:

Morning routine: H, J, B, W
Spread intervals: D, C
Evening session: X, G, AA, CC, Y, P, K and horizontal or vertical pulling movement, LB

A big hug to everyone, Norman

Hey Norman, good to hear from you again. It's great that you're progressing with the Maxalding and recovering your health. I wish you much continued success! :)
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Re: Maxalding

Postby Norman » Sat Mar 25, 2017 8:17 am

Hi Danny, thanks a lot! I will be reporting soon... Kind regards Norman
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Re: Maxalding

Postby Norman » Sat Mar 25, 2017 8:53 am

My Maxalding Diary Part 1 Saturday 03.25.2017:

I´m sitting here and thinking about how to promote the great system of Maxalding. Although being a newbie in this I already start to recognize the value of it... I could lose myself in the details of the exercises so I feel forced to limit myself to the most important ideas and insights I obtained these days.

I would like to start first with the exercises which yield suppleness to the ribcage and subsequently to the function of breathing. Maxick and Saldo emphasized the importance of full tidal breathing as to endurance and health. A detailed description of full tidal breathing can be fonud at the book "How to excel at Games & Athletics" from Saldo, here at this great website.

I practice often the exercises A and H (the isolation of the rectus abdomini while abdominal depression), B for scapular mobility and the opposite exercise C. With these exercises I made the experience that my breathing capacity improved a lot. My ribcage started to feel free making the practice of full tidal breathing a lot easier! I saw a lot of programs which started with these exercises.

How would I describe taking real deep breaths in the morning with a ribcage that feels wide and free? How to describe the lucent fresh energy provided by uninhibited deep breath?

What I noticed additionally was the relaxing sensations in my stomach after practicing the abdominal wall depression. In these stresssful days we often expereince a tense abdominal wall, something in Germany we call "a fist in the belly". The practice of A and further on H and I will loosen to my own experience this part thus relieving us from nervousness and even anxiety!

Enjoy the weekend and keep Maxalding regularly, kind regards Norman :D
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Re: Maxalding

Postby peter yates » Sat Mar 25, 2017 1:56 pm

Hello Norman,
thank you for your update. You express very well what is a difficult subject to describe. Maxalding is much more than a system of muscle building and can have far reaching effects on every system in the body. In frequent discussions with Gil Waldron, the point is made that Saldo was very much influenced by Asian systems of physical culture and incorporated ideas from those systems into his own training.From my study of both this seems to be very plausible.We also argue that Saldo did not get as much credit as he deserved for the creation of the Maxalding system.Anyway there is much to be explored and derived from its practice.Good luck with your training.
Regards,Peter.
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Re: Maxalding

Postby Norman » Sun Mar 26, 2017 8:37 am

Hello Peter,

thank you for your comment. I agree absolutely with your views. I study yoga and have found great parallels which point to the body mind connection, a topic we talked about last year. There is an old photograph from Selvarajan Yesudian, an indian yogi, showing his scapulae spreading like wings in a book called "sport and yoga". The similarity to exercise B is striking. Well, interestingly I assume that not only were the british people learning about yoga in the colonial times but also the indian learned about english physical culture.

Have a great sunday and cordial salutations to New York,
Norman
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Re: Maxalding

Postby Norman » Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:15 am

My Maxalding diary part 2 Tuesday, 03.28.2017

The "no pain, no gain"-bias

It´s just a few days ago since I wrote my first entry here... As I´m travelling a little bit next week so here comes part 2. As I were starting to immerse into the magic of Maxalding I met an old friend of mine which seduced me to "work out" till I was tired. It was what I call the "no pain no gain" bias. When we train seriously a few years we learn from books or coaches or YT tutorials. What do we have out there? When we want to build mass we are told to crank out repetitions until failure. When we want to reduce body fat we are induced to train HIIT´s for the EPOC effect, the torch that burns fat. Very tiring indeed...

This leads to the expectation to feel tired and "powered out", as we say in Germany after training. No tiredness, no success. When we are not exhausted, we did not enough! No pain, no gain. Shock the muscle, Arnie says! Tear it down until it begs for mercy and a quick death.

So with this mindset to begin Maxalding is a bad idea. And that happened to me after some Maxalding sessions. I felt good, energized, calm and relaxed yet strong and awake. But...Stop! Can it be I did not enough? Shouldn´t I feel tired? Can I build muscle without killing my biceps? These were odd feelings and I realized that there was a strong bias dwelling within me... And that I had to let go of these ideas! Why? I knew that I would harm my health following the usual training methods. The Lyme-germs in my body would dance celebrating my defeat if I followed the common workout regimes...

Maxalding is something completely different! It is about energy conservation and distribution. It is about health and accumulation and storing of vital force! It is about feeling strong and relaxed after cultivating. Thats why I love this art. And.... I can promise to every one that commits him or herself to Maxalding that it will yield results! As long as he or she sticks carefully to the given instructions of course...

A nice week to every one and keep Maxalding,
with kind regards, Norman
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Re: Maxalding

Postby Talbot » Tue Mar 28, 2017 5:16 pm

Maxalding should be taught to all those who are handicapped, by life or age, and can't "Pump Iron" or do "No Pain, No Gain" exercises. If only they knew that Maxalding exists!
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Re: Maxalding

Postby peter yates » Tue Mar 28, 2017 5:43 pm

Norman wrote:My Maxalding diary part 2 Tuesday, 03.28.2017

The "no pain, no gain"-bias

It´s just a few days ago since I wrote my first entry here... As I´m travelling a little bit next week so here comes part 2. As I were starting to immerse into the magic of Maxalding I met an old friend of mine which seduced me to "work out" till I was tired. It was what I call the "no pain no gain" bias. When we train seriously a few years we learn from books or coaches or YT tutorials. What do we have out there? When we want to build mass we are told to crank out repetitions until failure. When we want to reduce body fat we are induced to train HIIT´s for the EPOC effect, the torch that burns fat. Very tiring indeed...

This leads to the expectation to feel tired and "powered out", as we say in Germany after training. No tiredness, no success. When we are not exhausted, we did not enough! No pain, no gain. Shock the muscle, Arnie says! Tear it down until it begs for mercy and a quick death.

So with this mindset to begin Maxalding is a bad idea. And that happened to me after some Maxalding sessions. I felt good, energized, calm and relaxed yet strong and awake. But...Stop! Can it be I did not enough? Shouldn´t I feel tired? Can I build muscle without killing my biceps? These were odd feelings and I realized that there was a strong bias dwelling within me... And that I had to let go of these ideas! Why? I knew that I would harm my health following the usual training methods. The Lyme-germs in my body would dance celebrating my defeat if I followed the common workout regimes...

Maxalding is something completely different! It is about energy conservation and distribution. It is about health and accumulation and storing of vital force! It is about feeling strong and relaxed after cultivating. Thats why I love this art. And.... I can promise to every one that commits him or herself to Maxalding that it will yield results! As long as he or she sticks carefully to the given instructions of course...

A nice week to every one and keep Maxalding,
with kind regards, Norman

Hi Norman, i am sure most of us have been down the "no pain,no gain"route. As you say we live, train, learn and hopefully gain some sense of what we as individuals need.A big change occurred for me when i read an article where these words struck me "Do you live to train or train to live?"and "You should feel better after training than you did before." As i had been pushing really hard and never feeling completely recovered i pondered on this for a while and as i had both a background in MAXALDING and East Asian physical culture i had a good reference point.I dropped the going to failure, rest pause etc. and stopped a workout with a bit left in the tank and this resulted in better recovery, more energy and getting stronger.I now lift like i am doing qigong with focus on form, body alignment and breath.The end result of training should be construction,not destruction.
Regards,Peter.
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