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Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2018 1:02 am
by Handson
Though with talk of a possible Jewish Wrestler connection with this gear in days of yore, who knows?

A 400+ mile return scamper to South London to collect; shot blasting and 2 coats of black Hammerite transformation = useful addition to the Pullum bar accessories.

Thank you Rachel.

Handson

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2018 2:54 am
by David Gentle
That must be old Bill Pullums old Camberwell Weight Lifting Club discs.Note those type of discs are much harder if you go in for pinch lifting. wonder what happened to Pulllums old weigts? first real weights I had were made by a firm called....no kidding....C.Heap, which rather unfortunately looks like"cheap" they looked much the same as one illustrated, George Grose brought out some of the best weights, those with "holes in" supposedly "new" are in fact reallly ancient. You can see ads for them in very early Health and Strength mags. The ones with ridges are of course much better for grip strength training. Go back and you will see Grimek, Hepburn or John Davis doing some amazing stunts using heavy plates with rims. Claim for inventing the disc weight over the old fashion globe, shot loaded weights goes to Thomas Inch who called bodybuilding, "miniture weightlifting" David Gentle

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2018 9:53 am
by peter yates
Hi Handson, nice addition to your Pullum set. Same lady that Tom got his Sandow barbell from plus some Chas Trevor plates and other assorted stuff. Would love to know who the Jewish wrestler was, all we know is that he knew Sandow.
Regards,Peter.

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Sun Aug 12, 2018 5:54 am
by Handson
Hi Peter
Re the Sandow barbell and the wrestler connection I also urged the lady to try to find the invoice that would identify the grappler.
I quote literatim a message she sent to me; “If my husband had fallen over it one more time, it would have gone for scrap. It’s been in his garage at least 8 years”.
So I do hope the invoice still exists!

Meanwhile I’ve spent some time searching online about Victorian/Edwardian wrestlers in London
and there were many. According to Census records there was even a Wrestlers Court area in those times.

Interestingly Jiu Jitsu was also a very popular activity then, not just for men and e.g. a lady called Edith Garrud was a famous expert who acted as a bodyguard to her fellow suffragettes.

Whilst on the subject of early wrestlers I read about Bert Assirati who was active a bit later in the 1930s and may be known by some on the HOPC.

What a phenomenal strongman he must have been at around 18 stones and 5’ 6” tall.
Eighty years ago he:

Could lay on his back on the floor, and pull over at arms length a 200 lb.
barbell, to set a British record.
Could squat 800 lbs. unofficial World record.
Could squat with one leg with a 200 lbs. barbell on his shoulders.
Could squat continuously for half an hour while supporting 235 lbs.
Could perform three one arm pull-ups, at bodyweight of 240 lbs.
Could hold a one-hand stand when weighing 266 lbs.
Could do a crucifix on the rings when weighing 266 lbs.
Could do a military press of 160 lbs. with one arm.
Could perform a back somersault while holding a 56 lb. block weight in each hand.
Could perform back somersaults, or flip-flaps, while weighing 266 lbs.
Long distance cyclist.
Champion strand puller.
Could carry a piano a long distance on his back.
Could carry a telegraph pole a long distance on his back.
Regards
Handson

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Sun Aug 12, 2018 7:45 am
by peter yates
Thanks Handson, yes Bert Assirati is well known far and wide for both his strength and wrestling prowess. David knew his cousin Joe very well and you can find an article about him in the library written by David.Yes Jiu Jutsu was very popular and had an influence on some of the wrestlers of the period.Gil Waldron and i also believe that it also had an influence on the development of Maxalding, the exercise aspects that is, as some Japanese Jiu jutsu exponents trained at Saldo's gym.
Regards,Peter.

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 12:10 am
by Mobster
I had the great pleasure of meeting and interviewing Joe

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 6:24 am
by peter yates
Mobster wrote:I had the great pleasure of meeting and interviewing Joe
Hi Steve, so you did, it was in Muscle Mob. Great interview with a great old timer.
Regards,Peter.

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Tue Aug 14, 2018 11:48 pm
by Handson
peter yates wrote:Thanks Handson, yes Bert Assirati is well known far and wide for both his strength and wrestling prowess. David knew his cousin Joe very well and you can find an article about him in the library written by David.Yes Jiu Jutsu was very popular and had an influence on some of the wrestlers of the period.Gil Waldron and i also believe that it also had an influence on the development of Maxalding, the exercise aspects that is, as some Japanese Jiu jutsu exponents trained at Saldo's gym.
Regards,Peter.
Hi Peter

As you remark there must have been a mutual appreciation of complementary skills between the Japanese martial arts trainers and the various strongmen around at the time.

I came across this example showing two famous respective exponents and dated after the closure of the short-lived Baritsu Club in London.

BTW It looks potentially lachrymatory for Mr Tani given the effects of gravity on his pubes!

Regards
Handson

Re: Non-Combative Acquisition?

Posted: Wed Aug 15, 2018 5:35 am
by peter yates
Hi Handson,
nice card, thanks for posting it. By the way i am preparing an article on Baritsu for the library.In my collection i have a rare book by Tani which David kindly gave me.
Regards,Peter.