What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

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sticksb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by sticksb » Tue Oct 17, 2017 8:25 pm

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1972 Fat City . Stacy Keach . Down and out prize fighting tanker
Billy Tully gives it one more go . Keach , Jeff Bridges and Susan Terrell are
superb . Bleak and honest and along with "The New Centurions " my favorite
Keach roles .

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DannyBoy
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Wed Oct 18, 2017 9:00 am

^I saw Fat City years ago, excellent neo-noir film. You usually can't go wrong with John Huston films. :)

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Blacula (1972) starring William Marshall, Thalmus Rasulala, Vonetta McGee, Denise Nicholas & Gordon Pinset. African prince Mamuwalde, who was turned into a vampire by Dracula in 1780, is awakened in 1970s Los Angeles and stalks the night in search of a woman he believes to be the reincarnation of his long lost princess. Blacula is a blaxploitation horror film, the first one as a matter of fact, and paved the way for the many to follow in the 1970s & beyond. William Marshall is really a superb actor and the clear highlight of the film as Blacula/Mamuwalde, whom he plays with class & dignity as well as being intimidating & terrifying when necessary. The script though is perhaps formulaic and contains some holes, and there are some attempts at humor which come off quite awkward and a couple times interrupt the mood. Yet despite it's campy title & formulaic approach, Blacula is a pretty well done & entertaining early 70s (blaxploitation) horror film that's uplifted by the presence & performance of William Marshall as the title character.

Blacula (1972) - IMDb
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Scream Blacula Scream (1973) starring William Marshall, Don Mitchell, Pam Grier, Michael Conrad & Richard Lawson. Blacula is brought back to life through a voodoo ritual and then seeks the help of a voodoo priestess to cure him of Dracula's curse. Scream Blacula Scream is a follow-up to 1972's Blacula, released less than a year later. It would seem this film was put together & went into production rather quickly due to the success of Blacula, in order to strike while the iron was hot no doubt, and as a result it does show some indication as having been made in a hurry. Once again William Marshall shines as Blacula/Mamuwalde, giving the character the same kind of terrifying dignity he did in the previous film, and Pam Grier is also really good here in one of her earlier roles as she was becoming one of the biggest stars of blaxploitation films. Scream Blacula Scream isn't as good as the first film and leaves a bit of ambiguity in the end, but it's a worthy sequel to the cult classic Blacula and entertaining in it's own right.

Scream Blacula Scream (1973) - IMDb
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DannyBoy
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Thu Oct 19, 2017 6:40 am

Horror of Dracula (1958) starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Michael Gough, Melissa Stribling & Carol Marsh. After Jonathan Harker attempts to destroy Dracula at his castle, the count travels to a nearby town where he preys upon the family of Harker's fiancée and the only one who may be able to stop him is Doctor Van Helsing. Horror of Dracula is Hammer Films' take on the classic Bram Stoker novel "Dracula", directed by Hammer's top director Terence Fisher and the film that made Christopher Lee a star. Lee plays the legendary vampire in a more imposing & terrifying manner than Bela Lugosi's famous portrayal and is excellent, and Peter Cushing's turn as Van Helsing is impressive and makes the character out to be more of a fighter than previously portrayed. The film was beautifully shot in vibrant Technicolor and includes ample amounts of gore (for the time), as well as first-rate sets, costumes & special effects, not-to-mention a tremendously ominous music score by James Bernard. While Horror of Dracula is only loosely adapted from Bram Stoker's novel as well as a presents a considerably different story than the famous 1931 film version, it stands as one of the very best takes on "Dracula", is perhaps the best example of "Hammer Horror", and is simply a superb & chilling horror film, a real classic and the start of what became an iconic franchise.

Horror of Dracula (1958) - IMDb
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The Brides of Dracula (1960) starring Peter Cushing, Yvonne Monlaur, David Peel, Martita Hunt & Freda Jackson. A young schoolteacher on her way to a new position at a girls school helps a handsome gentleman escape the shackles his mother has locked him in, and in doing so unwittingly unleashes a disciple of Dracula to spread his vampire curse. The Brides of Dracula, again with Terence Fisher in the directors chair, is the first of 8 sequels to Horror of Dracula and one of the best. Peter Cushing is impressive once again as the returning Doctor Van Helsing, this time opposing vampire Baron Meinster played by David Peel since Christopher Lee chose not to return for this sequel. Baron Meinster isn't quite Count Dracula, but Peel shines in the role and makes the character a memorable one. The film's title is inappropriate though, there are no brides of Dracula in this film, just brides of Meinster. A more apt title would've been "Disciple of Dracula", which evidently was a working title for the film before it was decided to go with the "Brides of Dracula" title, and why that decision was made I don't know. As with the previous film this one was beautifully shot in vibrant Technicolor and features some first-rate sets, costumes & special effects. The Brides of Dracula is a great follow-up to Horror of Dracula and an exceptional horror film itself.

The Brides of Dracula (1960) - IMDb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Fri Oct 20, 2017 3:27 pm

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Robert Urquhart & Hazel Court. In prison and awaiting execution, Baron Victor Frankenstein recounts to a priest how he built a creature & brought it to life, which led to tragedy and his current circumstance. The Curse of Frankenstein is Hammer Films' take on the classic Mary Shelley novel "Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus" and directed by Hammer's top director Terence Fisher. The film is often credited with resurrecting the horror film genre in the late 1950s and is the first to feature the long & successful pairing of Cushing & Lee as an onscreen duo (though not the first film they both appeared in together). Here Peter Cushing is the standout as Baron Frankenstein, perhaps the screens definitive Baron Frankenstein, and probably the role he's most closely associated with and which he would play again 5 more times for Hammer. The film was beautifully shot in vibrant color and includes ample amounts of gore, as well as first-rate sets & costumes. Also notable is the impressive makeup Phil Leakey created for the monster, which gives it a more gruesome & grotesque look than the famous monster makeup used for Universal's Frankenstein films. The Curse of Frankenstein is more of a loose adaptation of Shelley's novel, but it's one of the very best takes on the story and the film that established "Hammer Horror" and set Hammer on the path of mostly focusing on horror films which the studio became legendary for. It's a true classic and the beginning of what became an iconic franchise.

The Curse of Frankenstein (1957) - IMDb
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The Mummy (1959) starring Peter Cushing, Christoper Lee, Yvonne Furneaux, Eddie Byrne & Felix Aylmer. In 1895, British archaeologists find & open the tomb of Egyptian Princess Ananka and 3 years later a resurrected mummy takes vengeance on those who defiled the tomb. The Mummy was the first film made after Hammer Films reached an official agreement with Universal Pictures to allow them to remake their classic horror films, and despite the film's title, this is Hammer's stylish re-imagining of Universal's Mummy films of the 1940s featuring Kharis rather than a remake of Universal's original The Mummy from 1932 featuring Imhotep. Here Christopher Lee as the mummy Kharis is given more of a chance to act & show emotion than Tom Tyler & Lon Chaney Jr. were allowed in Universal's Kharis films, which helps to really lift this film above those of the past. Once again, this is a Hammer film which features first-rate sets & costumes as well as some spectacular makeup by Roy Ashton. With the success of this film Hammer would go on to make 3 more mummy films over the next 12 years, though none of which were connected to this film nor each other. The Mummy is another Hammer classic and a superb atmospheric horror film.

The Mummy (1959) - IMDb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Sat Oct 21, 2017 8:35 am

The Curse of the Werewolf (1961) starring Oliver Reed, Clifford Evans, Hira Talfrey & Catherine Feller. A young man, the son of a deaf-mute servant girl raped by a beastly beggar and cursed as a result of the evil circumstances surrounding his conception & the bad omen of his Christmas Day birth, becomes a werewolf and terrorizes a village in 18th century Spain. The Curse of the Werewolf is Hammer Films' take on werewolves done in their "Hammer Horror" style, it was directed by Hammer's #1 director Terence Fisher and loosely adapted from the 1933 novel "The Werewolf of Paris" by Guy Endore. The film notably features legendary British actor Oliver Reed in the first starring role of his career, who is the standout of this film, but the entire cast gives excellent performances. The Curse of the Werewolf is a bit different among Hammer's horror films in that it has a slower pace than most Hammer horror films and the film's monster, the werewolf, isn't even seen for the first time until over an hour into the film. That's not necessarily a negative thing because the film's story is a good & intriguing one, which essentially unfolds in 3 parts and perhaps plays out less like a typical Hammer horror film and more like a horrifying fairy tale. Though I admittedly still would liked to have seen more of the werewolf onscreen. The werewolf design & makeup by Roy Ashton is hugely impressive and I'd rate Oliver Reed's barrel-chested, terrifyingly badass werewolf not only as my favorite movie werewolf, but also my favorite of Hammer's many great monster creations. As usual, this is a Hammer film which presents plenty of gore and a first-rate Spanish village set as well as costumes & special effects, and also features a unique music score by Benjamin Frankel. The Curse of the Werewolf was bewilderingly the only werewolf film Hammer Films ever made and I really have no idea why they never revisited werewolves again. Whatever the case, this film was a superbly crafted tragic horror tale, one of Hammer's best films and a classic.

The Curse of the Werewolf (1961) - IMDb
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The Plague of the Zombies (1966) starring André Morell, Diane Clare, Brook Williams, John Carson & Michael Ripper. A small Cornish village is suffering an outbreak of deaths from what seems to be a mysterious plague, but the deaths are actually being caused by a local squire through voodoo rituals so that he can use the dead to serve him as zombie slaves. The Plague of the Zombies is superb horror film from Hammer Films and another one of the studio's finest moments. The film features a very good all around cast, particularly André Morell as the film's aged hero Sir James Forbes and John Caron as the vile Squire Clive Hamilton. The Cornish village set is quite remarkable, especially the gloomy little cemetery where some of the film's action takes place, in particular a most chilling dream sequence. The most memorable aspect of the film though is none other than the zombies themselves, their gruesome, ghastly look is another of Roy Ashton's impressive makeup creations. Fittingly, the unforgettable depiction & look of the zombies in this film would go on influence the zombies of many films to follow, none more important than the landmark film of the zombie genre and the one which introduced the world to the flesh-eating type of zombies known best today; George A. Romero's classic Night of the Living Dead from 1968. The Plague of the Zombies is an eerie, atmospheric tale of horror and quite simply a "Hammer Horror" classic.

The Plague of the Zombies (1966) - IMDb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Sat Oct 21, 2017 2:35 pm

The Ultimate Warrior starring Yul Brynner, Max Von Sydow, William Smith & Joanna Miles. In a plague devastated world, one tired man finds a reason to fight. A deadly knife fighter helps protect a peaceful commune of survivors against a brutal gang in a pandemic devastated New York in the year 2012. The Ultimate Warrior is a fascinating post-apocalyptic action film directed by Robert Clouse of Enter the Dragon fame. Visually the film is quite impressive in the way it conveys a bleak future (at the time) New York, barren & desolate with few signs of life. Despite being in his mid 50s at the time, Yul Brynner is in fine form as the knife fighter Carson and looks good in the various fight scenes throughout the film. Also noteworthy are the performances by Max Von Sydow as Baron, who is superb as always, and perennial bad guy William Smith as vicious gang leader Carrot. As it pertains to post-apocalyptic action films, The Ultimate Warrior isn't quite The Road Warrior or Escape from New York, but it's one of the better examples of the subgenre and certainly an entertaining & thrilling film.

The Ultimate Warrior (1975) - IMDb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Sun Oct 22, 2017 6:30 am

Madam Satan (1930) starring Kay Johnson, Reginald Denny, Roland Young & Lillian Roth. A socialite disguises herself as a mysterious devil woman at a masquerade ball in order to seduce her straying husband. Madam Satan is musical comedy/romance produced & directed by the legendary Cecil B. DeMille. It's an odd film in the filmography of DeMille, but an entertaining one with all the showmanship & grandeur associated with him on full display. The masquerade ball aboard a zeppelin is particularly impressive and features some spectacularly extravagant & elaborate costumes and a couple of memorable & well staged musical numbers. The cast all play their roles well and Lillian Roth's beauty really caught my eye, but the highlight is the always great Roland Young whom I thought stole the show with his superb comedic talents. Madam Satan isn't the greatest film Cecil B. DeMille ever made, nor one of his better known films, but it's certainly an enjoyable, frolicsome film.

Madam Satan (1930) - IMDb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Sun Oct 22, 2017 3:35 pm

Lady for a Day (1933) starring Warren William, May Robson, Guy Kibbee, Glenda Farrell, Ned Sparks & Nat Pendleton. A gangster helps an old apple-vendor pose as a society woman in order to fool her visiting daughter, her fiancé & his father the Count. Lady for a Day is a merry film from the great director Frank Capra, who was quickly on the rise and earned his first Best Director Oscar nomination with this film. The plausibility of the storyline is open to debate, but the film is a first-rate production and features a great cast all around, with Warren William, May Robson, Guy Kibbee & Ned Sparks all especially being magnificent & memorable in their roles. Lady for a Day is a wonderful film that tells a beautiful story and is entertaining from beginning to end.

Lady for a Day (1933) - IMDb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Mon Oct 23, 2017 7:00 am

Long Lost Father (1934) starring John Barrymore, Helen Chandler, Alan Mowbray, Donald Cook & E.E. Clive. After the daughter he abandoned years earlier turns up as a performer at a nightclub he manages, a London nightclub manager tries to help her out of a serious predicament. Long Lost Father is a rather insignificant & little known programmer starring acting legend John Barrymore. The film is short and there's not a whole lot to it, but it is enjoyable while it lasts. Barrymore is amusing and a pleasure to watch as usual, Helen Chandler is lovely as his kinda wild & unconventional daughter, and Alan Mowbray plays a fine heel as the nightclub owner. While Long Lost Father was only a minor vehicle for the great John Barrymore, it's a delightful little film and certainly worth seeing if you're a fan of "The Great Profile" himself.

Long Lost Father (1934) - IMDb
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Re: What Was the Last Movie You Watched?

Post by DannyBoy » Mon Oct 23, 2017 12:30 pm

The Winning Ticket (1935) starring Leo Carrillo, Louise Fazenda, Ted Healy & Luis Alberni. A barber frantically searches for the winning sweepstakes ticket he hid from his moralistic wife so that he can collect his prize. The Winning Ticket is a pretty good comedy programmer from MGM headed by 3 fun actors in Carrillo, Fazenda & Healy. The film is a short & simple one, but has it's funny moments as well as it's touching moments and is enjoyable throughout. The Winning Ticket isn't anything special, but it's a pleasantly entertaining little comedy with a nice leading cast.

The Winning Ticket (1935) - IMDb
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