John Christy "lost" articles

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David Gentle
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by David Gentle » Mon Apr 09, 2018 11:42 am

Reading the articles so labourly well re typed out simply makes me re state just how valuable a site this is and what a high calibre of members we have. I too contributed to Hard Gainer,but nowhere near the standard or quantity that John Christy did. Stuart was a tough editor and would only use what worked,bo bull shit routines. David Gentle i am now going to print out the articles to make sure they no longer are "Lost" well done mate.
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by Tom K » Mon Apr 09, 2018 12:06 pm

I had a break from typing them out for a while, it got quite monotonous. But the other weekend I was left alone most of the day by the family and saw on another forum people referencing this thread.

So I was pleased that my work was not wasted, and I spent 2 hours typing the last post up.il I have a few more to do, then his book "real strength real muscle" will have effectively been digitised, as the hardgainer articles are easy to find online in a compilation.

I have all of these in word and pdf format and I hope to release a download of these in future to members on this site who want them as the full ebook. I'm sure it will disseminate out to the wider public after that. I think that last article was the longest one to type up though, fingers crossed

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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by peter yates » Mon Apr 09, 2018 12:35 pm

Thanks Tom,
please be assured your outstanding efforts were by no means a waste of time and are very much appreciated.As you say this information will reach a wider audience because of your diligence, when you are also leading a very busy life. It keeps coming back to a few simple principles as far as training goes and Christy does a good job in describing those. One thing i have found though after being in this game for almost 60 years is that everything will work, just not for everyone or all of the time. Another thing, is something that a lot of writers never tell you, and that is you can only go as far as your own potential will allow, not everyone will be able to pack on 30lbs of muscle and bench press 400lb. Nothing will ever change that, except of course drugs but we are talking natural here. If it were otherwise Woody Allen could look like Arnold,not going to happen. However anyone who invests time and energy into a simple, basic and well thought out program, [something that takes a bit of experimentation and reevaluation from time to time,] will discover untold benefits in better health, increased strength, added muscular body weight, improved posture and more self confidence. Surely these alone are worth the effort.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

Tom K
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by Tom K » Tue Apr 17, 2018 8:34 pm

Making you think

How badly do you want to get big and strong? Real bad- right? Then did you prepare enough food on Sunday (sandwiches, rice, oatmeal, protein drink etc.) to last you to at least Thursday? Honestly, answer the question; did you? What about aerobic work; did you hit it a couple of times last week to help recover from your workouts and to get your heat and lungs in shape to help you recover faster between sets? Have you been stretching to prevent injury?

I cant tell you how many trainees that I have worked with think they are really doing the best that they can- but in reality they fall way short of true dedication. And when they aren't getting the results that they feel they have earned by busting butt in the gym, they almost always blame the “program” (the solar system, the dog, their biorhythms, or almost anything else outside of what I mentioned above). Now, I'm not in any way suggesting that you need to live an unbalanced life where all you do is devote every waking hour to training and eating. You've got to work, some of you have to study, you have to take care of your significant other, some have to take care of your children, and you need to have a social life and spiritual life (and believe it or not maybe even a hobby outside of weight training!). But there is still PLENTY of time to train, do aerobic work, stretch and prepare food. And this last one is really a biggie. Its where most trainees falter. You need to make a decision. Do you really want it or not? Well if you're not willing to do what needs to be done, don't complain about not getting the results that you desire.

You know, when you combine proper nutrition with proper training the results can be staggering. One of our new trainees, a high school football player put on 21 pounds in 10 week while in season. He trained just two times per week for a half hour each session- after football practise when he was already tired. And no, this wasn't a 110 pounder who put on the 21. It was a 6'4”, 221lbs defensive end. The big secrets are; stimulating training that allows time for recovery and a CALORIC OVERLOAD- some big secret. After 20 years of strength coaching this is the primary areas where hard training trainees fail. You cant build a building without the proper bricks, steel, lumbar, mortar etc., no matter how many construction workers are running around. I hope you get my point here. Don't waste all the effort you put into a workout by not giving the body ALL the material it needs to take advantage of the stimulation that you created. This leads me to something else most trainees don't think about: when the growth, or change in strength, actually takes place. And its not when you're training.

I want you to start looking at the days between training differently. I want you to start viewing these days for what they turely are- they are THE opportunity for change; for strength and size gains to take place. The day that you train only gives you the CHANCE for change- but the actually change takes places in-between workouts! As simple as this is to understand, most trainees don't focus on the very significant importance of this. Hey, we all get fired up to lift, but who really gets fired up and focused on eating and stretching and resting and performing aerobic work on the days between? Not many. What a shame, because once again, this IS your ONLY opportunity for change! And all those things that I just mentioned WILL help you to get bigger and stronger. You'd be shocked at the gains that you could make workout to workout if you really grasped what I just wrote.

Okay, lets talk about “stimulating” workouts for a minute. Did you train really hard today? Did you focus on this before, and during your workout today? Or did you do a bunch of “mindless” sets that didn't amount to a hill of beans?

Get fired up when you train! This is your chance to stimulate change-make the most of it. Get focused on putting out maximum effort. Express yourself” Be an animal. Now you don't need to scream your head off just to draw attention to yourself, or fool yourself into believing that you're putting out effort, to be an animal. Everyone is different. Im relatively quiet although I make some interesting “guttural” sounds and talk to myself at times. My younger brother who is very accomplished, very big and strong trainee by anyone's standards is very, lets say “animated”. The point is to get yourself ready for battle, and you MUST prepare yourself before your workout to do this. You need to read my articles the White Moment and the Art of concentration to really get a better understanding of what I'm writing about. Its interesting how many well0intentioned and properly informed trainees seem to know about everything about WHAT to do, but don't work at HOW they need to be doing it. And “HOW” they need to be doing it is with tremendous aggression- Period!

Go to work on truly taking advantage of your days between workouts. Along with this really start focusing your efforts in the gym to getting yourself in the right “frame of mind”. I promise that if you do this, yoll be stunned by how much your workouts improve, and the results the generate.

Train hard, train smart, and dream big.

Parting words

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.”
Teddy Roosevelt

“Dream big and have faith in what I've shared with you; it'll give you hope- and hope is a great thing, maybe the best thing. I believe in you”

Coach Christy

peter yates
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by peter yates » Tue Apr 17, 2018 10:55 pm

Thanks Tom, you are a gem.
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baldeagle33
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by baldeagle33 » Wed Jul 04, 2018 1:37 am

Tom K wrote:I had a break from typing them out for a while, it got quite monotonous. But the other weekend I was left alone most of the day by the family and saw on another forum people referencing this thread.

So I was pleased that my work was not wasted, and I spent 2 hours typing the last post up.il I have a few more to do, then his book "real strength real muscle" will have effectively been digitised, as the hardgainer articles are easy to find online in a compilation.

I have all of these in word and pdf format and I hope to release a download of these in future to members on this site who want them as the full ebook. I'm sure it will disseminate out to the wider public after that. I think that last article was the longest one to type up though, fingers crossed
Hey Tom! Thank you for all the articles by Christy. I am new to the abbreviated training routines and he was one the greats! Do you have any more articles of his program design having a tough time figuring out which is good for me! Thank you!

peter yates
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by peter yates » Sat Jul 07, 2018 8:44 pm

Hi Baldeagle,
Welcome to the forum. I know Tom is often busy so sometimes has to take a break from the forum. As to where to start with Christy's training, i would just go to his first template routine. Start there and try things out then tweak as needed. Christy like many who wrote for Hardgainer did not jump around from program to program but stuck with the basics and used the slow cooking method of adding a tad of weight gradually and consistently. The thing is the work must be hard, no use just going through the motions.Often it is best to have a partner with you both for pacing and to encourage you. If you notice any changes in routine it would be to a similar exercise such as sumo deadlift in place of deadlift or front squat in place of back squat,always keeping with the biggies.Having A and B routines ensures all the major muscle structures are worked and adds enough variety to keep interest. Some things to keep in mind are, Christy never met you or spoke to you so any routine can only be a template for you to obtain ideas relevant to your training.That being said you can start as written and alter as needed as you go along.However if say you have pain doing the bench press but not with the incline press, common sense dictates using the later no matter what is written in the program. One more thing that is very important and rarely addressed is the fact that Christy and many other Hardgainer authors were not in fact hard gainers themselves nor were many they taught. Tremendous gains were credited to the training and diet protocols and while they may have been true we have to examine our own body type and potential. Gains of 40 and 50lb were often given, but maybe 20lb was muscle and 20lb fat. In my case i had to sweat blood for every lb of muscle i earned so could have easily become disheartened by their predictions. However training in such a manner will reap dividends in both muscular size, quality and strength relative to your own potential, so it is worth exploring.For another template on slow steady progress you should read Mobster's training logs and also the brief, basic, brutal and result producing illustrated programs from Sticks. Good luck with the training, please stay on the forum and keep us informed of your progress.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

Tom K
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by Tom K » Sat Jul 14, 2018 8:32 pm

Hey there,

Yes I have a few more to type up but I've been so busy that I've not had time. I've got a growing family and I just finished selling my house, and about to move- so I've had no time at all to do this.

I will finish this project though once it all quietens down.

At the moment I can't remember which articles I have left to finish, as I've misplaced the paper during getting the house ready to sell and be viewed, but I'll pick this up in the future.

As for training, the main thing I've taken away from Christy is the dedication to keep at it, even if the increase is tiny. Really, just create a routine which suits you and use his progression "benchmarks" to increase the lifts.

I did find that with my bench press, his recommendations started to get too much so I ended up increasing the volume to avoid stalling. I threw some Gironda style 30 second rest breaks high rep benching as a drop set following my "main Christy sets" and my bench press has continued to improve.

Thanks for the motivation to type another article though, it helps a lot to know people want to read this.

peter yates
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by peter yates » Sat Jul 14, 2018 10:39 pm

Hi Tom, I know you are a busy guy and your efforts are appreciated. You hit the nail on the head with progressions for us ordinary guys. Do it when you can and do not force it, slow cooking is the way to go,and as you have found any program has to be a adjusted to the individual. Good luck with the move mate, i hope you have a place to set up your Gym. ;) Nice to see you post again.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

Tom K
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Re: John Christy "lost" articles

Post by Tom K » Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:57 pm

I have moved house, still living out of boxes though :) But its coming along. New gym, and space to build a home gym in the future. Family is happy and I have a little time to type.

Enjoy

Jon Anderson- Updated

My first article on Jon chronicled the beginning of his weight training journey. As of the time of this writing a few years have passed since that first article. I'll give you a brief rundown of that article and then bring you up to date on Jon's progress, and most importantly the lessons he learned on the way. If you want the full details, please read The Basics work again.

I started working with Jon in July of 1996. He was a 21 year old college baseball player who had aspirations of becoming a professional. As a former professional baseball player I knew, as he did, that it would be difficult to get noticed by professional scouts at 5-10 and 170 pounds since the average size of a pro catcher is 6-2 and 230 pounds. So,we went to work to make him bigger and functionally stronger; strength that will help him with his sport. Just to make Jon bigger and stronger, without regards to the skills (functions) required by his sport would only hinder his progress as a baseball player. Here's his first program which started on July 5, 1996:

Workout A
1 Crunch 1x20 20lbs
2 Squat 2x8 135lbs
3 Bench press 2x5 105lbs
4 Supinated pull-down 2x5 120lbs
5 Single leg calf raise 1x20 50lbs
6 Static grip 1x 60-90 seconds 45lb DB's
7 Internal and external shoulder rotation exercises

Workout B

1 Side bend 1x15 30lbs
2 Sumo Dead lift 2x5 135lbs
3 Military press 2x5 65lbs
4 Barbell curl 2x5 60lbs
5 Wrist curl 1x20 60lbs
6 Internal and external shoulder rotation exercises



To make sure the new muscle and strength Jon was developing would help him as a baseball player, he performed skill work (hitting practise, throwing, sprinting), medicine ball work and stretching throughout the program. I also had him slowly increase his caloric intake to 4,000 calories per day via five to six “feeding's”. Seven months later, at a bodyweight of 205pounds, he completed the following:


Workout A
1 Crunch 1x20 75lbs +55lbs
2 Squat 2x5 315lbs +180lbs
3 Bench press 2x5 197.5lbs +92.5lbs
4 Supinated pull-down 2x5 192.5lbs +72.5lbs
5 Single leg calf raise 1x20 100lbs +50lbs
6 Static grip 1x 75 seconds 95lb DB's +55lbs
7 Internal and external shoulder rotation exercises


Workout B

1 Side bend 1x15 110lbs +80lbs
2 Sumo Dead lift 2x5 300lbs +165lbs
3 Military press 2x5 100lbs +35lbs
4 Barbell curl 2x5 103lbs +43lbs
5 Wrist curl 1x20 122.5lbs +62.5lbs

So, you're probably wondering how 35 pounds bodyweight and a big increase in overall strength affected his playing abilities. Jon finished the 1997 season hitting .380 with 2 homers and 4 triples. He also registered a reduction in his throwing time to second base (which is an indication of an increase in arm power). These statistics show an increase in performance over his previous season, but were only a hint of how his strength increase would eventually help him on the field.

Many of you are probably thinking “those statistics aren't that great for such an increase in strength, particularly in the home run department.” You're right but, as I've always said, change takes time. Jon had a few friends and family members that also started questioning the reasoning for what he was doing, or more accurately, what I had Jon doing. Jon, though, had faith that it would take some time for his body to adapt its new strength and size to the particular skills of baseball. He also had faith in me.

The update

Throughout the 1997 summer baseball season, Jon continued to strength train and continued to make subtle improvements on the field- nothing earth shattering yet, but I could see that Jon was starting to convert his strength to his skills on the field. His program wasn't much different to what he was doing before. The only differences were an reduction in training volume- only one work set per exercise- and on Workout B we replaced the dead lift with lower-body plyometric work (box hops) and dropped the military press and instituted medicine ball work for his upper body.

When the summer season ended, I designed the following program; listing work sets only- warm up sets are additional:

Workout A
1 Crunch 1x5
2 Squat 2x5
3 Bench press 2x5
4 Seated row 2x5
5 Static grip 1x60 to 90 seconds

Workout B
1 Box hops 2x10
2 Medicine Ball forward ab throw 2x10
3 Medicine ball side ab throw 2x10
4 Medicine ball Chest throw 2x10
5 Side bend 1x5
6 Leg curl 1x10
7 Lateral raise 1x15
8 Posterior delt raise 1x15
9 Lying triceps extension 1x8
10 Barbell curl 1x8
11 Back extension 1x8
Workout B looks high in volume relative to what I normally prescribe, but most of the movements on this workout aren't very stressful systematically, with the exception of the plyometric work. Jon actually called workout A “the hard workout”.

I'm judicious in recommending small isolation type movements like the Lateral raise and Posterior Delt raise in workout programs unless there is a specific reason to do so. I prefer to use an overhead pressing type movement like the military press to stimulate the shoulder (and other associated) muscles. The lateral raise was used in this case to minimize the possibility of impingement of the smaller muscles of the shoulder, which the military press has a higher possibility of creating. What this boils down too is reducing the risk of an on the field injury that actually came from the weight room. The posterior deltr raise was used to create a strength balance between the anterior and posterior shoulder muscles; very important for all weight trainees- critical for baseball players.



Six months after beginning this program, Jon, now a very big man at 230 pounds, was performing box hops to a surface that was over 30 inches high. He was using a medicine ball that weighed 18 pounds. Box hops to 30 inches (especially for a 230lb man) and medicine ball work with a 18 pound ball are very, very good accomplishments. At this time Jon was able to squat (one inch below parallel) with 425lbs and could bench (touch-and-go style) 275 pounds.

These numbers represent a very good accomplishment for roughly a year and a half in the weight room on a proper program, but you must remember that Jon was weight training to become a better baseball player—not to power lift. The true measure of the effectiveness of the program would be in the results of the upcoming season.


The 1998 season

In August of 1998. Jon's statistics looked like this: a .404 batting average, 15 triples, and 34 home runs: very impressive numbers. These were accomplished in a season in which he played only 100 games. At 5-10 and 230 pounds Jon now also looked very much like a professional catcher—big and durable. He made many "all-conference" type teams and the professional scouts now had their eyes on him for his senior season (1999). Now, I want you to remember that it took almost two years of extremely dedicated training to start to positively affect his abilities on the field. Remember how Jon's family and friends were questioning what he was doing? How many of you can stay the course for two years to "start" to make good progress; especially if other trainees are questioning your abbreviated training approach and the use of those "little stupid plates" (Micro-loading)? How many of you can then stay with it for another three years to get results so impressive that they shock your peers? At the conclusion of the 1998 season Jon and I talked about his training goals for the next six months (the off-season). His goals were the same as from day one—to get stronger, and gain muscle. What changes did I make to the program so that he would be at his strongest ever? None! That's right- none. He used the same basic, single-progression program utilizing Micro-loading as he did from the start. He just needed more time on the program. This is where most trainees go wrong. They start to make progress on a good basic program, but want the results to come faster than is possible, so they invariably change to a marketed “wonder program” and end up getting nowhere; no results and usually hurt or sick. I've said it many times, but it deserves repeating. To make great progress you must adhere to a basic program based on progression, good technique and training two to three times per week that will allow for recovery. This must be performed consistently, and in a few years, other gorillas will start hanging-out at your house.


March 1999: The setback

Jon now weighed 240 pounds and had increased his strength another 10-20% on all movements. He was able to run the 60-yard dash in 6.9 seconds (faster than when he weighed 170 pounds), which is considered very good for a professional catcher. He had worked very hard on his skill work during the off-season and was primed to make his mark this season so that he could earn a professional contract. Well, at least that's how we planned it. During the second week of the season, Jon suffered a fracture of his wrist during a game. He would miss his entire senior season, and lose the opportunity to show-case his talents to professional scouts. This made his chances to become a professional baseball player very slim.

You can just imagine what a blow this was to Jon. But I assured him that his dream of becoming a professional athlete didn't have to end if he didn't want it to. He didn't. So he went back to work. Throughout the season he helped the team, while letting his wrist heal following surgery. He continued to work out around the injury performing lower body and core work.

By August 1999 the wrist had healed, and Jon went back into a full training program, with as much drive and determination as I've ever seen. It was at this point that I let Jon in on a secret training program that would get him stronger in less time than ever before. I'm sure you've all heard of these "secret programs," and for the right price I can get you one. Well, if you believe that, then I've got some ocean front property in Montana that I'd like to sell you. What a bunch of B.S. There are no secret programs! You know what I had Jon do? He went right back to his same old (some would call boring) program. Once again he just needed more time to get more results, not a new program.


Now that Jon had no college eligibility left, we had to come up with a way to get Johns abilities noticed by professional scouts so he would have a chance to be offered a pro contract. Jon became a self marketing machine. He wrote letters and called all the scouts that showed interest in him after his tremendous 1998 season.

The marketing efforts paid off. In September 1999 Jon got offered and contract to play in the prestigious (on the minor league level) Northern league. He would report in May 2000. SO we had a 9 month off season to make Jon the strongest, most well conditioned baseball player he could be. By November, he got his bodyweight up to 242 pounds and had regained most of his strength in all exercises, and had actually gotten stronger on a few. His squat was back up to 420 pounds, and his bench press was up to 270 pounds; now with a one second pause at the chest which makes the movement much more difficult.

We decided that Jon now needed to drop a little bodvfat (though, believe me, he wasn't fat) to ensure his speed and quickness. So l altered his diet (simply dropping a few calories) and increased his low-level aerobic work. Jon was also sprinting two days per week. So, you may be wondering how Jon squeezed all this into a seven-day week and without over training. He would perform two weight workouts per week. He would sprint on one of the workout days (this constituting his leg work for the day), and then again another time during the week on the same day that he would perform skill work. He also did one day of low-level aerobic work on a stationary bike for over an hour to help with the fat loss. Mixed in was another day of skill work. So, all told Jon had three days per week where he could recover; two complete days of rest, and the one day of low-level aerobics which aid recovery. Also, I need to mention that during this time Jon held down two jobs to make ends meet. So, don't think all he did was train, rest and eat. When Jon reported to his new team in May 2000, tipped the scales at 228 pounds and was now stronger and better conditioned than he had ever been. Yes, he lost weight and got stronger. If you know what you're doing, and are patient, you can accomplish these goals at the same time. Just understand that you'll have to decrease the rate of progression on the weights, increase low-level aerobic work, and use a dietary strategy that provides the nutrients you need to workout and recover, and yet creates a hormonal state that increases fat burn-off. That's it!

The big decision

Jon was one month into his first professional season when he was forced to make the toughest decision of his young life. Due to family circumstances, Jon had to give up his professional baseball aspirations. I can't go into the details of what happened, but I can assure you most people would have crawled into a shell for a while after giving up something that they worked so hard to achieve. Jon didn't, even though he had just given up his dream of playing pro baseball.

He went back home, got things worked out, and in August 2000 Jon was back in school completing his education that would get him accepted into Chiropractic college. He held down 2 jobs to make ends meet. After a short period I received a phone call from Jon; he informed me that he now wanted to compete in powerlifting.

August 2000 to May 2001

This will bring us up to the date of this writing. Jon is now a monster at 250 pounds. Here's his current program. You'll find its not much different than the original, except the weights used, of course.

Workout A

Shoulder rotation
Crunch
Squat 435lbs x5 and 550lbs x1 *
Bench 265lbs x5 and 315lbs x1- with pause *
T bar row -seated- 172lbs x5 *
Barbell hold 185lbs x2x60 seconds

Workout B
Shoulder rotation
Side bend
Sit-up
Sumo dead lift 400lbs x5 and 450lbs x1 *
Military press 150lbs x5 and 190lbs x1- with pause *
Barbell curl 125lbs x5 and 145lbs x1 *
Calf raise 345lbs x20
Reverse calf raise 30lb DB x20

*Exercises used in the 5-3-1 cycle


For the powerlifter s I train, I use a 5-3-1 weekly rotating rep cycle on the exercises with an asterisk. One week you perform 5 reps as your goal, the next week 3 reps, and then the 3rd week you perform 1 rep sets (I call these “working singles”). Perform two to three sets if you are a beginner to intermediate level trainee and up to five sets if you are advanced. I classify an advanced trainee as someone who can squat at least double bodyweight, dead lift 2.5 times bodyweight and bench 1.5 times bodyweight. This is a single progression scheme that utilises micro loading as the means of progression. It is similar to the 9 week powerlifting preparation program that I wrote about in the article designing your training program except that this is designed to be used for a long cycle, up to a year in length.

Every week the trainee will add weight to the bar dependent on what they did the last time on that particular week. When the cycle gets hard, the rates of progression on the 5 rep and 3 reps weeks will be as illustrated in the article Designing Your Training Program. On the week of the 1 rep sets a loading of 2 to 5 pounds can be sustained for many months. Or course, this is all dependent on whether the trainee is gaining a lot of weight, maintaining, or losing weight.

I've found that this type of "cycle" keeps the powerlifter ready to hit a maximum single attempt at any time, and they always have an idea of what their absolute strength limit is in the competitive lifts. This type of cycling is not only for the competitive powerlifter, it can he used by any trainee who desires to increase their absolute (one rep) strength. Although I would prefer beginner trainees to spend the first couple of years training consistently in the 5 rep range to increase muscle mass and to lay a good foundation of relative strength before utilizing heavy single repetitions as a long-term training strategy.

You'll notice that Jon also performs "singles" on curls. He competes in a powerlifting organization that includes the strict barbell curl as one of the lifts contested—along with the traditional squat, bench press and dead lift. This is known as a Power-sports competition. Power-sport competitions are drug tested and performed "raw" (no support equipment other than a belt). The weights that he uses on the crunch, side bend and spread-eagle sit-up have been "fixed" at these poundage's for quite some time due to the fact that the heaviest dumbbell in the gym where he trains weighs 130 pounds. He's working on rectifying this. Along with his weight training, Jon performs aerobic work two days per week for one hour. He also runs (mid-level aerobics) one time per week for 20 minutes.

In conclusion


The first article I wrote on Jon was called the Basics work again. Almost five years later I could use the same title for this article. I want to reiterate that for most of the time that Jon has been under my tutelage he was using a program based on the goal of becoming a better baseball player (until the last eight months or so). If his goal from the start was to just get stronger and bigger, his lifts would be at least 10 or 20% higher than they are now. Also, I want you to realize that Jon has trained alone (outside of two summers training under my direct guidance) for a majority of this time- no training partner and no hands on coach.

It doesn't take a complicated program to reach ones strength and size goals. What it does take is faith in a simple program based on progression. It takes tremendous effort and dedication. It takes real desire to “get it up” week after week, month after month and year after year on a program that, for those who are seeking a magic program, would seem “boring”. You see, if you are like Jon- making the kind of progress he's made from day one- you wouldn't get “bored”. Believe me, there's nothing like making continual progress on a workout to workout basis, to make a simple program exciting and challenging.

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