Body Weight and Free Exercise

Topics that focus on building strength and muscle using old school and modern training techniques. Post questions, share training tips and programs.

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David Gentle
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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by David Gentle » Fri Feb 09, 2018 7:38 pm

RE Bill Hunt and Mick Bolton, i wrote full length articles on them both in Dave Williams Strength Athlete. Bill was a tough old bugger, used to write proper letters to me(still have them) and was also probably next to Maxick, Maxaldings most famous pupil in most of the adverts. Mick Bolton was a good guy, tough grip as Peter says from his stunts with wall bricks, i worked on the buildings, and know how bricks can make your hands bleed with use, some bricks being heavier than others , ie. wire cuts rather than "facers" we used to do the regular ," see how many bricks you can lift with the arms shoulder height pinch grip". As for rope climbing, having the pre mentioned bird legs, it was quite easy for me to climb ropes without using the legs, in fact also climbed the ropes hands only gripping a small barrel between my feet to add weight, problem w as after reaching about 30 feet up a tree, lost my grip, slid down the rope, cut two large grouves in my hands as in rope burns and after that went back to sissy dumbell one arm rowing. If i find the articles will give the references for them, or even try some high tech and get pix attatched...who knows whats possible with possitive thinking, then maybe not. and yes Pete, had a slight "inckling" the bromide is wearing off, had a touch of wood, more like a splinter really, David Gentle
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peter yates
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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by peter yates » Sat Feb 10, 2018 8:58 pm

Hi David,
glad you mentioned the rope climbing but not the bromide. :lol: Another great exercise for the grip if you do not have a rope is to put a couple of towels [not your mum's or wife's best] over a chinning bar. Now squeeze them tightly and do hangs or pull ups,preferably both. Progressions can be by adding weight or even hanging by one arm at a time.If you can do 1 arm pull ups this way you are getting pretty good i would say,even hanging for time is very good.Of course with a little imagination you can fix all manner of things to hang from the chinning bar to work the grip.
Regards,Peter.
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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by peter yates » Tue Mar 20, 2018 5:13 pm

Well for working the abs and waist area body weight training offers many options.In fact many B/W exercises such as pull ups, push ups etc. strongly work the whole region. However a couple of exercises that are often overlooked that are really excellent for building a strong, well muscled and just as important,healthy abdomen come from the Maxalding system. The first control i was ever taught was the vacuum and it has been a regular of mine throughout the years. Once mastered it is easy to do anywhere, anytime and several short sessions throughout the day will tighten and trim the abdomen and just as importantly massage the internal organs.I do them first thing in the morning and before each meal most days. Vince Gironda was a big fan of these as he felt a lot of the standard abdominal work thickened the waist whereas the vacuum really pulled it in and trained the muscles to stay tight.Following on from the Vacuum i was taught the central isolation, another wonderful Ab exercise and again one that can be done as needed easily throughout the day. These two are wonderful for those with digestive problems and constipation and overall health promotion. It must be added that although both are standard muscle control exercises they have been practiced by wrestlers and Physical culturists in India for centuries. Gil Waldron and i have had many conversations about the links between modern muscle control and the ancient health practices of the East and this is one of them. Now i had gotten out of the habit of doing them on a regular basis but a couple of months ago decided to start again. It has been quite easy to fit them into my day and as i mentioned just do some in the morning and before meals and an odd time here and there. The results without doing any other work except my regular exercises has been very noticeable. Smaller waist, a visible six pack and feeling of firmness all round. The library has all the information you need to learn these if you have not done them before. I do advise when doing the vacuum to exhale all the air out through the nose rather than the mouth, this seems much smoother, to me at least. If anyone else has any more to offer on this i would be glad to hear.
Regards,Peter.
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Internalfitness
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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by Internalfitness » Tue Mar 20, 2018 8:06 pm

Hi Peter.

I have tried over the years to 'have a go' at the vacuum from the Maxalding course, but it has never really felt right.

Perhaps you can answer my newbie queries and it might help me and others.

The phrases used are ones like: "Raise the ribs", and "push the chest forward but not up (without moving the back or shoulders)". Now those are pretty daunting instructions!

I used to start with the seated version (hands on thighs, upper body leaning in slightly) and I tended to try and expand the ribs sideways while rotating them slightly - but is this not pushing the chest "up"?

Next, I run out of puff almost immediately! I am not one for not breathing during exercise (especially when it feels like I should be), so what is the actual idea - "a few moments" as 1 version of the course suggests, followed by several deeper breaths?

This is honestly something I would like to get better at.

Richie.

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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by Internalfitness » Tue Mar 20, 2018 8:11 pm

AND (while I think on, having just tried it again) - should there be any pelvis rotation?

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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by peter yates » Tue Mar 20, 2018 8:48 pm

Hi Richie,
well i am no expert on this and there are others on the site more qualified to give advise but this is my take on it. I agree that looking at the instructions seems a bit overwhelming but it can be made more simple. The problem is at first your mind is thinking of so many things that movement cannot be natural.The fist step actually does not require much if any movement, later when this becomes smooth and natural you can progress to true diaphragm control but that is not actually necessary in order to do a vacuum or rope. I would just forget about the ribs as they will move all by themselves, with a slight bend over really exhale out all the air and if done correctly you will feel a "catching" in the throat as if a lock had been put on,[sorry that is the best i can describe it.]Your abdominal muscles should be as relaxed as possible so at that moment you can draw the abdomen up and back toward the spine.This is all done smoothly or should be. If you can get the vacuum but not hold it do not worry, just practice getting the vacuum and gradually you will be able to hold it for a few seconds, from where you can slowly increase the time held. Between attempts take a few deep breaths.I would also visualize yourself doing the maneuver in your mind going through the steps smoothly, remember muscle control is as much mind control as anything.Lastly these exercise are really all about internal fitness so make them yours. I hope this helps and i welcome those more knowledgeable than i weighing in.
Regards,Peter.
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Gil Waldron
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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by Gil Waldron » Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:48 pm

Hi
I've read Peters article on abdominal control, and I agree these exercises are very powerful movements for both the muscle and the gut. Once the first control Diaphragmatic control (Exercise A Maxalding) is perfected it is then possible to move on to more advanced controls, such as central isolation and abdominal roll ( Maxalding exercises H.& I.) These exercises can be found in the HOPC library. Once all the controls are mastered, which will take a little patience and perseverance, it will be found that as Peter says the abdominals will show a marked improvement. I once read somewhere Maxick never did sit ups or any thing similar, and his abs were second to none. See pictures in the Maxalding section of the library. Also you will probably find a marked improvement in the workings of the digestive system. Maxalding wasn't just a bodybuilding or strength system, it was a complete health guide. And internal health was prime to the whole course. Tromp van Diggelen who was with Monte Saldo whilst he developed Maxalding, Wrote a series of booklets called Health Through Common sense, which incorporated some of the abdominal exercises. Try them for while, and post your results please
Gil
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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by peter yates » Thu Apr 05, 2018 4:35 pm

Hi Gil,
thanks for your input.So true what you say about Maxalding being a total health promotion system, the muscular development being somewhat of a by product of creating a more efficient internal system.Do you have any other tips you could give Richie apart from what i have written as i know my knowledge of Maxalding is limited.
Regards,Peter.
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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by sticksb » Thu Apr 05, 2018 6:54 pm

Historically this thread is a course in itself . During my early training for strength + size my
movements gravitated to all overloaded exercises . Pull-ups and dips were done with heavy
weights . In retrospect this was a mistake . I only practiced "balls to the wall" training and knew little
of cycling . Inclusion of light to moderate high rep bodyweight exercise (instead of hit heavy 100%) is a
way of building in a subtle cycling failsafe that not only promotes healing and condition but renews
enthusiasum for training .

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Re: Body Weight and Free Exercise

Post by peter yates » Thu Apr 05, 2018 10:13 pm

sticksb wrote:Historically this thread is a course in itself . During my early training for strength + size my
movements gravitated to all overloaded exercises . Pull-ups and dips were done with heavy
weights . In retrospect this was a mistake . I only practiced "balls to the wall" training and knew little
of cycling . Inclusion of light to moderate high rep bodyweight exercise (instead of hit heavy 100%) is a
way of building in a subtle cycling failsafe that not only promotes healing and condition but renews
enthusiasum for training .
Hi Chris, i could not agree more. A few weeks on higher rep bodyweight exercises interspersed throughout the year will go a long way in extending any lifters career. Not only giving traumatized joints a rest but also strengthening the muscles in unique ways that will aid in better performance once lifting is resumed. In the past many lifters/bodybuilders [often one and the same]would take several weeks off in summer doing hand balancing, ring and high bar work, diving and swimming etc.Most of it done outside in fresh air, which was rejuvenating in itself. Once back on the weights gains were almost always forthcoming. I have said this many times but one of the best things a bench press guy can do as an assistance exercise is push ups. These will give the whole shoulder girdle including the cuffs incredible stability and save the joints from a lot of unnecessary wear and tear. Anyway Chris not many young studs will listen to what we have to say, yet several years down the line may be giving the same advise.
Regards,Peter.
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