"Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

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chrallen67
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"Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by chrallen67 » Fri Jun 29, 2018 1:02 pm

Hi, do any of you have trouble deciding doing Bodybuilding (3 sets of 6-12 reps) vs Strength Training 5-8 sets of 3-6 reps? Ive decided to try to incorporate some of both. Just an interesting conundrum that I am always questioning myself on. The 3 sets of 8-12 reps just seems like pumping in a way, but you can do more exercises, and its kind of "safer" in many respects. But Strength training is more fun to me as each set is a clear goal, workouts build upon each other--more purpose, more challenge. But it takes time. like this morning Military Press strength training took me 35 min . I spent the remaining 25 min doing more bodybuilding. Another problem with strength training is that it can lead to injury (as seen in my left knee having pain doing squats)--Not that you can't get injured doing lighter BB, yes you can of course wih poor form or whatever may occur. just seems much less chance.... just some thoughts as what I contemplate

peter yates
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by peter yates » Fri Jun 29, 2018 5:39 pm

Hi Chris,
well my take on this is that unless you are training for specific strength related events,it is best to do both. In the old days this was the more common approach.Take for instance, those who i term Power Bodybuilders,such as John Grimek, Bill Pearl, Clancy Ross, Leo Robert, Chuck Sipes and Reg Park. All of them thickly muscled and all very strong too. Also many weightlifters and power lifters from past eras would often include higher rep bodybuilding type training in their programs and even take a few months a year doing just bodybuilding to give their bodies time to repair, one classic example is the great Tommy Kono.Bill Starr would have his trainees do low reps 4-6 on power moves and higher reps 15-20 on assistance exercises.One gentleman recently discussed in the ask a question thread was Adrian Heryet, top British bodybuilder and power lifter.Near to home is our own Mobster who is an overall strong man and has one of the strongest grips in the world. Steve includes various rep schemes in the his training and has back off periods with higher volume and reps.In my own case strength and conditioning have been priorities, given that my potential for anything resembling a decent physique was at the outset abysmal, as these are clearly measurable. I never got to be as strong as i wanted or as big as i wanted but i am sure i got as big and strong as my lousy potential allowed. Several years ago after a shoulder injury and coming back with rehab i discovered that if i did my first set with a very light weight for many reps, then added weight gradually doing as many reps with each set until i got to the point where i was starting to feel a twinge, that i was not only helping the injury but my muscles responded favorably, possibly because this was unusual to them.Anyway my physique filled out somewhat and i was gradually able to get back to my working weights in presses, dips etc. Not only that but i also felt healthier. Reading some posts by one of my favorite 60s bodybuilders Dave Draper reminded me of his training and others of his generation, start with 12-15 reps, then 10-12, 8-10, 6-8. This of course can be modified for the exercise and individual,In an article by Grimek i read he liked start with 10 reps then work down to 3, 2 or singles. This type of training gets the best of both and i believe is easier on the body. Of course you can pick two or even three lifts you want to up the weight on and keep the reps low.Then as Starr recommended use higher reps for the assistance exercises. At my age i am happy to be still in the game and enjoying training as much as ever.For the past few months i have been doing higher reps in my training and feel the overall benefits.I use as much weight as i am able in each set so it is intense, add weight, lower reps Ala Draper. On my heavier, low rep sets my strength is about the same so it is not affecting that adversely. A pleasant side effect is the boost to my ego, as my body is taking on a better shape and fullness,which is something i would never have expected after all these years. End of the day try different things and see what works for you.Above all have fun.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

chrallen67
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by chrallen67 » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:25 pm

Thanks Peter, yes Im definitely "filling out" quick from the Heavier Presses and Deadlifts, and it is fun. Just dont want what happened to my knee from front squats to happen with the shoulders from heavy pressing. But it is fun, or back from Deadlifts. So far No shoulder problems or Back,,just my left knee. Which I will probably try very light squats again early Fall,I mean very light, and not go even parallel maybe.

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David Gentle
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by David Gentle » Fri Jun 29, 2018 7:33 pm

Train for both as who wants huge muscles without at least some better than average power. for some strange reason, the number of approx 30 reps in total seem to work out well for both, i.e, 3 x 10, 4x 8, 5x6, and 6x4. you ,must always do at least one premier warm up set with a light weight, just to put the muscles through their full range. and the higher reps appear to add pump and size, the lower reps, power. also your brain and muscles are lazy and need stimulus of change and a break from bordom. for fast improvement in power,eg. bench press, try the system already explained in full on the site called "A special strength system" originated by former mr universe and mr britain, Don Dorans, who incidentally was also a champion muscle controler, which aided relaxation and recover. You will of course use heavier weights with the low reps and lighter weights with the higher reps,but find the system suggested and give it a try, i went from 200 to 300 bench press in amazing fast time when a low bodyweight. The system, often called railroads, where you start off with a light dumbell and work up the rack with heavier and heavier weights and lower and lower reps is also a great stimulus for bored muscles. David Gentle
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peter yates
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by peter yates » Fri Jun 29, 2018 11:16 pm

Hi David,
the system you mention and wrote about is great and when you first wrote about it was the first time i heard of such a method. I can most certainly say it is a method that works and i put it into practice soon after reading about it. The neat thing is that in a short time you see the weight you were struggling to get 8 reps with is now being used for 12. A big boost to the enthusiasm. I have used it many times with my own tweaks over the years,highly recommended.Yes no need to settle for one when you can have both.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

sticksb
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by sticksb » Sat Jun 30, 2018 1:50 am

Bodybuilding is strength training . The variable is the "Tweak". Tweaking takes place
over a lifetime and will head you in many different directions .On this forum I offer tips
but can't TELL a person how to train . Only suggest . How you react , how you progress ,
how you recover is up to you know who.

Mobster
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by Mobster » Sat Jun 30, 2018 4:53 am

As I said on a podcast on another forum (and being a purist / pedant for the sake of debate): it's a difference of volume. You could also argue of intent and food.

For me, more so in competition mode, muscle or bodybuilding becomes a bonus vs the intent of adding strength

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dhartnet
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by dhartnet » Sat Jun 30, 2018 9:25 am

To me, I dont find it fun to lift light weights. I will when Im older Im sure.
For now (and age 52) after 40 years of training, I still need to challenge myself during my workouts.

I do however always finish a body-part with a high rep/pumping exercise. Sort of gets blood flowing into the joint, after stressing it with previous heavy loads.

Example:

Chest (After warm up):

Bench Press - 4 sets of 5 (heavy)
Dumbbell Bench - 4 sets of 5 (heavy)
Incline Bench - 4 sets of 5 (heavy)
Hammer Strength Decline Bench - 4 sets of 5 (heavy) (Thank you Kim Wood)
Light flyes - 4 sets
---------
~Dave

peter yates
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Re: "Bodybuilding" vs Strength Training

Post by peter yates » Sun Jul 01, 2018 11:00 pm

I think some distinction should be made between training with light weights and doing higher end reps.i consider using a weight that could be done for 30 reps and only doing 20 as using a light weight no matter the weight on the bar. Also using a weight in say the curl were 15 reps would be possible but doing several sets of 10 would again to me be using a light weight. Let us not forget there is a system passed down from professor Attila were very light dumbbells are used for very high reps. The last two do have their place in training at various times and for certain individuals. Now for me high rep sets are done after a warm up and the weight used needs to be heavy for that number of reps.Example if doing the first set of bench press requires 20 reps then 21 reps would not be possible and if so weight needs to be added next time.The next set with added weight should be equally as hard and so on till all sets are completed. Each set is a work set, so this is not really light training as the weight matches the reps required and believe me this is hard work and i find it more so than staying in the lower rep range for all my work sets. At this time in my life this training is kicking my butt,yet i am able to recover quicker and am not losing strength on my lower rep sets.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

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