Blood Flow Restriction Training

Topics that focus on building strength and muscle using old school and modern training techniques. Post questions, share training tips and programs.

Moderator: peter yates

Post Reply
User avatar
drob357
Site Admin
Posts: 328
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:54 am
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by drob357 » Fri Jan 03, 2020 8:30 pm

Happy New Year Everyone.

Has anyone heard of a Japanese technique called Blood Flow Restriction training? It apparently addresses the loss of muscle mass as it relates to the natural ageing process. Here is a link to the video on Dr. Mercola's website. I would be most grateful for your feedback and comments on this topic. Thanks.

https://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitne ... ining.aspx
Diane Robert
Chief Librarian/Site Administrator
https://davidgentle.com

Talbot

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by Talbot » Fri Jan 03, 2020 9:58 pm

It appears to be a completely bogus system. Total hype, to create a fad. It is not what I recommend, nor what I do.

However, I shall do some research on the matter, and get back to the forum, to report on what I can find.

User avatar
drob357
Site Admin
Posts: 328
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:54 am
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by drob357 » Sat Jan 04, 2020 7:24 am

Thanks Talbot. I share your concerns about this method as it goes against the grain from traditional weight training and how the body responds. Some members of the lifting community are excited about this concept so I felt it would be worth exploring a little further.
Diane Robert
Chief Librarian/Site Administrator
https://davidgentle.com

peter yates
Posts: 2659
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:38 pm
Location: NEW YORK, USA

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by peter yates » Sat Jan 04, 2020 1:17 pm

Hi Diane,
BFR training, also known as occlusion training has been around for quite some time and now and then rears its head. In the 90s a lot of people were getting on the bandwagon and then it seemed, like all fads, to fizzle out. While i think it may have some use as therapy in the right hands, i personally do not feel it is a good method of training for the mainstream. The message with this and other systems that crop up is "exercise can be easy, no need to work hard and you still get the results." My recommendations to anyone wanting to train is go the tried and tested route, and do not be in a hurry,enjoy the journey.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

User avatar
drob357
Site Admin
Posts: 328
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:54 am
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by drob357 » Sat Jan 04, 2020 3:57 pm

BFR training, also known as occlusion training has been around for quite some time and now and then rears its head. In the 90s a lot of people were getting on the bandwagon and then it seemed, like all fads, to fizzle out. While i think it may have some use as therapy in the right hands, i personally do not feel it is a good method of training for the mainstream. The message with this and other systems that crop up is "exercise can be easy, no need to work hard and you still get the results." My recommendations to anyone wanting to train is go the tried and tested route, and do not be in a hurry,enjoy the journey.
Well stated Peter. Thank you for sharing your insights. There are no shortcuts in the gym.
Diane Robert
Chief Librarian/Site Administrator
https://davidgentle.com

Paul Shaw
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2016 7:07 am

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by Paul Shaw » Sun Jan 05, 2020 8:15 am

Happy New Year to all

This system of training like all things physical culture is as old as the hills

C A Sampson put out this system of muscle development in 1895 in his strength book. He was struck by lightening and whilst bed ridden he had some metal rings hung from the ceiling to assist with pulling him self up. As a bored young man he began slipping the rings over his arms and flexing his biceps against the rings. The system was thus born, he had a well developed bicep and used to break chains fastened around his biceps in his stage act.

He recommended using rubber bands around the limbs whilst exercising with light dumbbells- starting to sound familiar yet.


Paul




E
Attachments
IMG_6055.PNG
IMG_6055.PNG (708.9 KiB) Viewed 3047 times
IMG_6054.PNG
IMG_6054.PNG (598.58 KiB) Viewed 3047 times

User avatar
drob357
Site Admin
Posts: 328
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:54 am
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by drob357 » Sun Jan 05, 2020 5:49 pm

Thanks Paul for sharing this interesting info on how this muscle development concept got started along with the accompanying photos. Much appreciated!
Diane Robert
Chief Librarian/Site Administrator
https://davidgentle.com

Talbot

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by Talbot » Sun Jan 05, 2020 7:50 pm

Blood Flow Restriction is dangerous, and can lead to strokes and arterial damage. On reading the whole link that Diane posted, the first "clue" was the KAATSU kit for ONLY $899!!! Yeah Right! You can always spot a hyped fad scam, by the high priced gizmos that go with the ripoff.

And to disagree with Paul Shaw, what C.A. Sampson was doing with rubber bands, wasn't for blood flow restriction, rather it was for added muscle resistance. I myself have used Ace Bandages, wrapped around my muscles, firmly, however nowhere near tight enough to restrict blood flow, to give added resistance to the muscles being exercised, with light weights. It is a good workout.

The fact is: there is no physiological way, that blood flow resistance "training" will grow muscle tissue.

User avatar
drob357
Site Admin
Posts: 328
Joined: Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:54 am
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Contact:

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by drob357 » Mon Jan 06, 2020 5:52 pm

Blood Flow Restriction is dangerous, and can lead to strokes and arterial damage. On reading the whole link that Diane posted, the first "clue" was the KAATSU kit for ONLY $899!!! Yeah Right! You can always spot a hyped fad scam, by the high priced gizmos that go with the ripoff.

And to disagree with Paul Shaw, what C.A. Sampson was doing with rubber bands, wasn't for blood flow restriction, rather it was for added muscle resistance. I myself have used Ace Bandages, wrapped around my muscles, firmly, however nowhere near tight enough to restrict blood flow, to give added resistance to the muscles being exercised, with light weights. It is a good workout.
The fact is: there is no physiological way, that blood flow resistance "training" will grow muscle tissue.
Thanks Talbot for researching this training method and for your valuable information. I shared the posts to this thread with a fellow who was seriously considering this method as he had reached a sticking point which he attributed to age. After reading everyone's comments he's decided instead to try and work harder in the gym. He sends his thanks to all.
Diane Robert
Chief Librarian/Site Administrator
https://davidgentle.com

peter yates
Posts: 2659
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2014 3:38 pm
Location: NEW YORK, USA

Re: Blood Flow Restriction Training

Post by peter yates » Tue Jan 07, 2020 9:47 am

Hi Diane, has the fellow reached a sticking point or reached his potential.It seems many think they can keep gaining forever.We all have a cut off point where no more gains in muscle size will occur, our own natural potential.What we can do then is specialize on weak areas or focus on specific strength gains such as grip training for competition etc. Also even though the muscle may not get any bigger we can work on quality, shape and refinement.Most importantly we all need to recognize that muscle building is only one part of the training benefit.Continued health and strength,vitality, mental clarity, posture, social interaction and a host of others are all improved by regular training.The slowing down of the aging process is surely another wonderful benefit,not the stopping of it mind, but the slowing down.My suggestion would be for him to take a few days to a week off, as he may be just burnt out.Then evaluate his training and what changes may be needed.Training harder is not just the answer but training smarter for his needs at this stage in his life.This site has an incredible amount of training information and resources, reading those may help. Also just want to add, by changing my training up last year i have made some really nice improvements at almost 70.
Regards,Peter.
Peter Yates

Post Reply